Course Description

A widely-used strategy for managing acute suicide risk is the contract for safety, also known as the no-suicide contract. Despite its widespread use across mental health and medical settings, accumulating consensus is that this approach may be ineffective. Alternative strategies, such as crisis response planning or the related safety planning intervention, have therefore been proposed. Written on an index card, the crisis response plan outlines simple steps for a suicidal individual to follow when in a crisis. Results of a recently completed randomized clinical trial show that crisis response planning reduces suicide attempts by 75% as compared to the contract for safety, thereby supporting the method’s efficacy. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of crisis response planning, and to differentiate the method from other, less effective means for managing suicide risk.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe an empirically-supported biopsychosocial model of suicide.
  • Differentiate between stable and dynamic aspects of suicide risk.
  • Identify the primary motives that drive suicidal behavior.
  • Describe narrative assessment strategies to increase accurate and honest disclosure of suicidal ideation and behaviors.
  • Help patients to identify personal warning signs of emerging emotional crises.
  • Develop a written crisis response plan to reduce acute suicide risk.
  • Use cognitive strategies and interventions to undermine suicidal beliefs that contribute to suicidal behaviors.

Instructor

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in cognitive behavioral psychology, and is currently the Executive Director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at The University of Utah. Dr. Bryan received his PsyD in clinical psychology in 2006 from Baylor University, and completed his clinical psychology residency at the Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, TX. He was retained as faculty in the Department of Psychology at Wilford Hall Medical Center, where he was Chief of the Primary Care Psychology Service, as well as the Suicide Prevention Program Manager for Lackland AFB. Dr. Bryan deployed to Balad, Iraq, in 2009, where he served as the Director of the Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic at the Air Force Theater Hospital. Dr. Bryan separated from active duty service shortly after his deployment, and currently researches suicidal behaviors and suicide prevention strategies, and psychological health and resiliency. He currently manages numerous federally-funded projects in excess of $10 million, to include studies testing cognitive behavioral treatments for suicidal service members, developing innovative methods to identify and detect high-risk military personnel and veterans, and disseminating effective treatments to health care providers and the public. Dr. Bryan has published over 150 scientific articles and several books including Managing Suicide Risk in Primary Care, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Preventing Suicide Attempts: A Guide to Brief Treatments Across Clinical Settings, and the Handbook of Psychosocial Interventions for Veterans and Service Members: A Guide for the Non-Military Mental Health Clinician. He is the lead risk management consultant for the $25 million STRONG STAR Research Consortium and the $45 million Consortium to Alleviate PTSD, which investigates treatments for combat-related PTSD among military personnel, and has served on the Board of Directors of the American Association for Suicidology. He is considered a leading national expert on military and veteran suicide. For his contributions to military mental health and suicide prevention, Dr. Bryan has received numerous awards and recognitions including the Arthur W. Melton Award for Early Career Achievement, the Peter J.N. Linnerooth National Service Award, and the Charles S. Gersoni Military Psychology Award from the American Psychological Association; and the Edwin S Shneidman Award for outstanding contributions to research in suicide from the American Association of Suicidology.

Continuing Education:

Evidence-Based Practice Institute (EBPI) is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) to offer continuing education for psychologists. EBPI maintains responsibility for the program and its content. EBPI has allocated 1 hour of continuing education within APA guidelines for this course.  After attending the webinar, a CE certificate will be emailed to the attendee.

EBPI has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6898. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. EBPI is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. EBPI has allocated 1 CE Hour for this course. After attending the webinar, a CE certificate will be emailed to the attendee.

Note: Licensing and continuing education requirements vary by state. Please contact your state's regulatory authority to verify if this course meets licensing and/or continuing education requirements. You may also contact our CE department at support@ebpi.org or by calling 206-455-7934 ext. 81.